sinlesss:

Human history. Things which remain consistent: sex, death and war.

(Source: drrestless, via fabforgottennobility)

16 hours ago
410,392 notes

bobbycaputo:

The Death And Decay Of Disco

In a country with literally dozens of celebrated historical monuments, photographer Antonio La Grotta pays tribute to a different sort of relic: discotheques, abandoned and decaying. In their repose, there is an otherworldliness quality about them, looking as though they are the remains of crash-landed disco spaceships.

Mostly built in the 1980s, the buildings are sometimes daring with the occasional swooping bold line here and a vaguely extraterrestrial silhouette there. However, the design borrows more from chintzy Las Vegas glamour. One discotheque — fittingly named “Last Empire” — is decorated with reclining Greek statues and columns. Another takes the form of a giant boat, marooned on land and in time. Some are a little more abstract, such as the “Woodpecker,” which is comprised of a system of round covered pavilions in a marshy swamp.

(Continue Reading)

1 week ago
109 notes

bobbycaputo:

Satellite Images That Will Change The Way You See The Earth

Removing ourselves from our surroundings often brings us closer to them. Astronauts speak of the Overview Effect, passing over Earth and seeing it only as a fragile speck in a massive solar system. The desire to protect and preserve is felt, as national boundaries evaporate and a global interdependency is realized. These satellite images are fascinating, overwhelming and thought provoking.

(Continue Reading)

(via crookedindifference)

2 weeks ago
1,111 notes

kseniiakhrabrykh:

Artist Turns A Record Player Into An Automatic Illustrator

What can turntables do besides play vinyl? For Ally Mobbs, an artist from Kyoto-by-way-of-England, her newest exhibition Turntablism For The Hard Of Hearin

g: Harmonic Motion takes the pure definition of “turntablism”—manipulating recording sound using direct drive turntables—to create evolving images. In other words, the spinning decks look like they have suddenly developed a penchant for doodling beautiful mathematical shapes and forms that are reminiscent of sonic sinusoidal waveforms.

Read More

(Source: Vice Magazine)

2 weeks ago
3 notes
bobcronkphotography:

All Orbs Must Fall - Sunset off the coast of Kona on The Big Island of Hawaii.

bobcronkphotography:

All Orbs Must Fall - Sunset off the coast of Kona on The Big Island of Hawaii.

(via fabforgottennobility)

1 month ago
6,560 notes

vejiga:

Noruega en TimeLapse

(Source: youtube.com)

1 week ago
6 notes

rhamphotheca:

griseus:

WORLD OF CHANGE:  ARAL SEA - BIGGEST ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER IN CONTEMPORY HISTORY

It took millions of years for the Aral Sea to form, and just a few decades to divest it of water

The Aral Sea is situated in Central Asia, between the Southern part of Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan. Up until the third quarter of the 20th century it was the world’s fourth largest saline lake, and contained 10grams of salt per liter. The two rivers that feed it are the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, respectively reaching the Sea through the South and the North. The Soviet government decided in the 1960s to divert those rivers so that they could irrigate the desert region surrounding the Sea in order to favor agriculture rather than supply the Aral Sea basin. 
Aral Sea’s surface area has now shrunk by approximately 74%, and its volume by almost 85%. The ecosystem of the Aral Sea and the river deltas feeding into it has been nearly destroyed, not least because of the much higher salinity. The land around the Aral Sea is also heavily polluted, and the people living in the area are suffering from a lack of fresh water, as well as from a number of other health problems.
The receding sea has left huge plains covered with salt and toxic chemicals, which are picked up, carried away by the wind as toxic dust, and spread to the surrounding area; the population around the Aral Sea now shows high rates of certain forms of cancer and lung diseases, as well as other diseases. Crops in the region are also destroyed by salt being deposited onto the land. 
The United Nations has estimated that the sea will essentially disappear by 2020 if nothing is done to reverse its decline.
  • credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using data from the Level 1 and Atmospheres Active Distribution System (LAADS)
  • Map by EB 2010
  • More Info: The Aral Sea Crisis
2 weeks ago
907 notes
letsjorgepartida:

maya47000:

Wat Asokaram by Nott Sutthipong 

By Nott Sutthipong

letsjorgepartida:

maya47000:

Wat Asokaram by Nott Sutthipong 

By Nott Sutthipong

(via fabforgottennobility)

4 weeks ago
303 notes

typette:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio

The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.

The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

I REMEMBER THIS LEVEL IN SHADOW OF THE COLOSSUS

IT WAS AWESOME

(via deliriumtrenesdospuntocero)

1 month ago
3,979 notes